BUGS a film by Andreas Johnsen, opens in Toronto, January 13

bugs-pic

BLUE ICE DOCS

presents

A Grubby Gastronomic Adventure

BUGS
a film by Andreas Johnsen

OPENS IN TORONTO

Friday, January 13, 2017

Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema – 506 Bloor Street West


Trailer: https://vimeo.com/162505800

BUGS is one of the most compelling documentaries about food in the past few years.” – Mxdwn ««««

“This aspect of BUGS – its willingness to push at questions that often lie beneath the surface of entomophagy-based discourse – really appealed to me.”  – NPR

“Invigorating film” – The Hollywood Reporter
For three years, a team from Copenhagen-based Nordic Food Lab, made up of chefs and researchers, travelled the world to learn what some of the two billion people who already eat insects know, and have to say.

Opening Friday January 13, 2017 at Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema, BUGS a film by Andreas Johnsen (Ai WeiWei The Fake Case) kicks off the new year with the question, will insects save our earth?

BUGS follows three young men from Nordic Food Lab – Josh Evans, Ben Reade and Roberto Flore, as they forage, farm, cook and taste insects with communities in Europe, Australia, Mexico, Kenya, Japan and beyond. During their journey they encounter everything from revered termite queens and desert-delicacy honey ants to venemous giant hornets and long-horned grasshoppers.

The Nordic Food Lab journeymen experiment with culinary practices and tastes – in a two-way process of learning from others around the world while trying to push boundaries themselves.

Over the last few years, since the UN recommended edible insects as a resource to combat world hunger, insects as food has become a hot topic. They have been heralded for their taste by cooks and gastronomes, for their low ecological impact by environmentalists, and for their nutritional content by public health scientists. It would seem that insects are the new superfood that will fix all our problems of global food security.

BUGS offers an open-minded exploration into the world of edible insects.

The Buzz about Bugs

  • Entomophagy (ento·moph·a·gy |noun): the practice of eating insects
  • Insects as Food: Insects form part of the traditional diets of at least 2 billion people globally.
  • Edible Insects: More than 1,900 insect species are considered edible for humans.
  • Popular Pests: The most consumed insects are beetles, caterpillars, bees, wasps and ants
  • Bug Business: The global edible insect industry is estimated to be worth $522 million in 2023
  • Sneaky Snacks: You already unknowingly consume about two pounds of insects per year


BUGS
is written and directed by Andreas Johnsen, Edited by Menno Boerema, Produced by Sigrid Jonsson Dyekjaer, Associated Produced by Sidsel Lonvig Siersted, with cinematography by Johnsen. Distributed in Canada by Blue Ice Docs.

About Andreas Johnsen: Andreas Johnsen has made a number of documentaries as both a director and a producer since 2002. His films have been shown around the world on many festivals and on television in Denmark and abroad. His film ‘Ai Weiwei – The Fake Case’ was nominated at IDFA’s “Feature Length Competition”, nominated in Berlin 2014 at Cinema for Peace Awards and won the Danish Film Critics Award 2014. The film has furthermore been selected for over 15 film festivals, been sold to BBC and 7 other territories.

About Nordic Food Lab: Nordic Food Lab is a non-profit, open-source organization that investigates food diversity and deliciousness. Established in 2008, they combine scientific and humanistic approaches with culinary techniques from around the world to explore the edible potential of the Nordic region.

About BLUE ICE DOCS

Founded in 2014 in partnership between Robin Smith, president of KinoSmith, and Blue Ice Group co-owners, Steven Silver and Neil Tabatznik, Blue Ice Docs uses the expertise and skills of both organizations to acquire, fund and develop a wide variety of non-fiction projects from around the world. Upcoming releases include, OBIT, FRANCA: CHAOS AND CREATION, NOTES ON BLINDNESS, AIM FOR THE ROSES, ABACUS: SMALL ENOUGH TO JAIL.